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On Pilgrimage (October 1955)

Summary: Anticipates the ordeal of her and others’ appearance in court for disobeying the Civil Defense Act. They plead guilty. Visits migrant workers in southern Minnesota and describes their hard life. Praises the work of women for donations to the stricken of the world. Lauds the factory work in Chicago of the Little Sisters of Charles de Foucauld. (DDLW #929). The Catholic Worker, Oct 1955, p. 3

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On Pilgrimage – September 1955

Summary: Visits and visitors fill her days and conferences and talks fill many evenings. Praises Ammon Hennacy’s annual fast and picketing for America’s dropping of the atom bomb. Says handicrafts provide relaxation and create beauty–“the rhythm of life which overflows in work of hand and brain.” (The Catholic Worker, September 1955, 5, 8. DDLW #691).

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Where Are the Poor? They Are In Prisons, Too

Summary: A graphic description of how she and 29 others were treated by the police, jailers, and courts after arrest for protesting air raid drills against nuclear attack. Gives a reason for the protest and decries the inhuman aspects of their treatment–crowding, lack of food, waiting. Notes: “What a neglected work of mercy, visiting the prisoner.” (DDLW #241). The Catholic Worker, July-August 1955, 1,8.

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On Pilgrimage – June 1955

Summary: Discusses the problems with the selling of Maryfarm, the difficulties of construction at Peter Maurin Farm and extends an appeal for assistance. Recounts her trip to Montreal, Canada and her encounters with the various communities and people who live with the poor there. She concludes with a reflection on the values of work and silence. (The Catholic Worker, June 1955, 1, 6. DDLW #687).

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On Pilgrimage – April 1955

Summary: Fr. Daniel Lord, who recently died, is remembered for his work with youth in the fields of Catholic Action and contentious objection. Describes her time at the farm attending conferences and caring for her grandchildren. Ruminates about human freedom in relation to involuntary poverty. Keyword: pacifism (The Catholic Worker, April 1955, 2, 7. DDLW #686).

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The Insulted and Injured

Summary: The tale of Felicia, a young Puerto Rican woman struggling to survive in the city living in a tenement with her husband and three children. Discovers they are being exploited to over pay for furniture which is already nearly worn out. Decries the exploitation of the poor, especially by other poor people. Concludes by pointing out the beauty of the spring and says “..God is not mocked.” (The Catholic Worker, April 1955, 1, 6. DDLW #684).

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On Pilgrimage – March 1955

Summary: Deplores the destitution brought on by the present social order of capitalist industrialism, describing their soup line. In contrast, lauds the self-sufficient life of Hutterite communities. Supports organic gardening. Concludes the solution to physical destitution is through spiritual means: “We are en-route, on pilgrimage, and our job is to trust, to hope and to pray, and also to work ‘to make that kind of a social order when it is easier for man to be good.’” (The Catholic Worker, March 1955, 1, 4. DDLW #683).