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On Pilgrimage (February 1965)

Summary: Travels to North Carolina and Georgia to speak and visit friends. Recapitulates basic Catholic Worker ideas in a question and answer format. Comments on the government’s war on poverty, Communism in Cuba, the role of the Church in society, Vatican II, and the gap between haves and havenots. Keywords: war, voluntary poverty, work (DDLW #822). The Catholic Worker, February 1965, 1, 6.

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More About Cuba

Summary: Rues the nationalism and waste of resources that continues in our relations with Cuba–“out next door brothers.” Says she will continue to write in the light of faith about all that contributes to “a heartwarming zeal for the common good.” Keywords: war, pacifism (DDLW #800). The Catholic Worker, February 1963, 1, 4.

 

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On Pilgrimage (January 1963)

Summary: On a speaking trip, weary of Winter travel, she mentions the strong interest in Cuba and the social changes in Latin America among her listeners. Visits her family in Vermont and extols family life as the ordinary way of working for the common good. Observes a group of men who had made “a cursillo, a course in Christianity” praying together and asks all to pray for men joined together in love. (DDLW #799). The Catholic Worker, January 1963, 2, 6.

 

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On Pilgrimage to Cuba (Part IV)

Summary: Notes the fervor of the revolution in the wake of the missile crisis of October. Mentions the open seminaries and work of religious sisters, food shortages, friendly people, absence of drunkenness. When asked if she could find nothing wrong in Cuba she lists their many struggles. (DDLW #798). The Catholic Worker, December 1962, 2, 5.

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On Pilgrimage In Cuba (Part II)

Summary: Comments on the campaign to make everyone literate in Cuba and the impassioned style of Fidel Castro’s oratory. Asserts that she found freedom of religion. Includes an extensive quote from Castro where he says one can be a revolutionist and a Catholic as long as anyone holds to the aims of the revolution and justice holding religious beliefs in his heart. (DDLW #795). The Catholic Worker, October 1962, 1, 2.

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On Pilgrimage In Cuba: Part III

Summary: Continues the account of her pilgrimage in Cuba with a story of getting lost on the bus system. Delivers supplies to the National Hospital. Stays with several families and visits collective farms. Admires many new homes going up, sturdy furniture, and pockets of free enterprise. Notes everyone’s hunger for education. Describes Catholics who struggle with the language of the revolution but work for the common good in building up society. Sees similarities between Peter Maurin’s philosophy of work and efforts to build up Cuban society. (DDLW #796).The Catholic Worker, November 1962, 1, 3, 4 , 6, 8.

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Pilgrimage to Cuba–Part I

Summary: Departs for Cuba to see for herself life under Castro’s communism, especially farming communes, the life of the family, and religious freedom. Humorously comments on the 40 rules in fine print on her steamship ticket. Deflects critics who say she won’t be truthful and see much. Reaffirms her pacifism even though Cuba “is an armed camp.” ” I will try to make the Cuban story come alive.” (DDLW #793).The Catholic Worker, September 1962, 1, 6.

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More About Cuba

Summary: A response to critics who view the Catholic Worker as pro-Marxist-Leninist. Reflects on the Catholic Worker’s role in the Church. Affirms the need to listen to the truth, whatever the source, and the need for spiritual weapons and nonviolent means to overcome evil. (DDLW #247). The Catholic Worker, July-August 1962, 1, 7.

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About Cuba

Addresses the issue of supporting the Cuban revolution while the Church is being persecuted there. Reaffirms solidarity with the poor and is critical of clergy who ignore the poor. Affirms opposition to violent revolution and the ultimate triumph of good over evil. (DDLW #246: The Catholic Worker, July-August 1961, pages 1, 2, 7, 8).