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On Pilgrimage In Cuba (Part II)

Summary: Comments on the campaign to make everyone literate in Cuba and the impassioned style of Fidel Castro’s oratory. Asserts that she found freedom of religion. Includes an extensive quote from Castro where he says one can be a revolutionist and a Catholic as long as anyone holds to the aims of the revolution and justice holding religious beliefs in his heart. (DDLW #795). The Catholic Worker, October 1962, 1, 2.

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On Pilgrimage (June 1961)

Summary: Recounts with gratitude the donations they receive and notes how quickly they become poor again. Upbraids herself for giving advice instead of giving leeway to each worker. Doesn’t like all the clutter but respects individual freedom. Travels to Detroit, then to visit Tamar in Vermont. (DDLW #783)The Catholic Worker, June 1961, 1, 2, 6.

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The Case of Cardinal McIntyre

Summary: Elaborates on the Catholic Worker relationship with Church authorities over many years and the “conflict of freedom and authority.” Reaffirms the laity’s freedom of conscience and leadership role in action against injustice. Reproaches “our shepherds” who fail to preach voluntary poverty and “preach the gospel in season, out of season, and that gospel is ‘all men are brothers.’” (DDLW #196).

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Workers of the World Unite

Summary: Celebrates the 25th anniversary of the C.W. Perceives freedom as the greatest gift to man from God, and advocates a four hour work day, child labor, private property as personal property and manual labor. Personalism works from the bottom up and reminds her readers that Jesus told people, not states, to perform works of mercy. (DDLW #177). The Catholic Worker, May 1958, 1,3,11.

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More About Holy Poverty. Which Is Voluntary Poverty

Summary: Describes her trip to Antigonish, Nova Scotia and her stay with the community. Discusses her meeting with the United Mine Workers and how cooperative stores there have built a spiritual foundation for their material needs distribution. Comments on the community’s independence and its inter-dependence on one other. (DDLW #146). The Catholic Worker, September 1938, 1,3,4.

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Reflections During Advent, Week Four: Obedience

Summary: Ponders the relationship between freedom and authority, faith and obedience. Uses her conversion and starting of the Catholic Worker as examples of conscience and the great freedom of the laity. Cites various authorities and the example of Pope John XXIII on freedom and obedience. Ultimately, links obedience to love and her faith. Repeats the need to “search the Scriptures” and to achieve a “second conversion” to the faith. (DDLW #562). Ave Maria, December 17, 1966, pp. 20-23.