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On Pilgrimage (June 1961)

Summary: Recounts with gratitude the donations they receive and notes how quickly they become poor again. Upbraids herself for giving advice instead of giving leeway to each worker. Doesn’t like all the clutter but respects individual freedom. Travels to Detroit, then to visit Tamar in Vermont. (DDLW #783)The Catholic Worker, June 1961, 1, 2, 6.

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Reflections On Work – March 1947

Summary: Focuses on worker ownership and calls for workers to fight for the means of production, to shun working for the war effort, for priests to come out of their rectories to help the poor, and for all to start the struggle for reform of the social order and against charity growing cold. Repeats the need to be one with the poor and to resist the present social order. (DDLW #452). The Catholic Worker, March 1947, 2, 4.

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And There Remained Only the Very Poor

Summary: “Those of you who read this, those of you who have helped us before, help us.” A thousand poor people come for food each day–“. . .they are Christ appearing to you.” In spite of their dire straits, war and preparation for war, she calls for rejoicing in nature and for what they have and God sends. (DDLW #364). The Catholic Worker, July-August 1940.

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Beyond Politics

Summary: Discusses the C.W.’s means to achieve a better social condition in comparison to communist means. Exhorts “the rich to become poor and the poor to become holy.” Criticizes capitalism’s unbalanced distribution of wealth and admits a certain compatability exists between Marx and Christianity. (DDLW #166). The Catholic Worker, November 1949, 1,2,4.