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On Pilgrimage (April 1952)

Summary: Celebrates the feast of the Annunciation with frolicking grand children, kissing the springtime earth. Complains of fatigue and morning stiffness. Laments her inefficiency but recommends relaxing prayer, even in the midst of the disorder of happy children. (DDLW #926). The Catholic Worker, April 1962, 1, 6.

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On Pilgrimage (October/November 1966)

Summary: Reveals that a pilgrimage in September 1932 to the shrine of the Jesuit martyrs and her later prayer for a vocation at the Blessed mother shrine combined to draw Peter Maurin to her. Resolves to halt travelling to complete writing assignments after two speaking engagements already agreed to. Notes the first wedding of a grand child and death of her brother Donald. Notes the sadness of November with nature dying around us until we rise again. (DDLW #845). The Catholic Worker, October-November 1966, 2, 7.

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On Pilgrimage (July/August 1963)

Summary: Goes to Danville, Virginia, and describes the brutality of the police against demonstrators. Speaks at a spirited prayer meeting devoted to civil rights. Ties civil rights to education, jobs, health care, and averting war. Participates in picketing. Says, “We all have something to give.” Notes the death of friends. (DDLW #805). The Catholic Worker, July-August 1963, 1, 2, 7.

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On Pilgrimage (January 1963)

Summary: On a speaking trip, weary of Winter travel, she mentions the strong interest in Cuba and the social changes in Latin America among her listeners. Visits her family in Vermont and extols family life as the ordinary way of working for the common good. Observes a group of men who had made “a cursillo, a course in Christianity” praying together and asks all to pray for men joined together in love. (DDLW #799). The Catholic Worker, January 1963, 2, 6.

 

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The Council And The Mass

Summary: On the eve of the beginning of Vatican Council II she pens a personal appreciation of the Mass and its role in her life and the meaning of participating in its celebration. She has harsh words for priests who mumble and rush through both English and Latin prayers at Mass. (DDLW #794). The Catholic Worker, September 1962, 2

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Khrushchev And Alexander Nevsky

Summary: Retells the non-violent efforts of the 13th Century Russian hero Alexander Nevsky with the Mongol invaders. Notes the parallel to the new United Nations where East and West try to avoid atomic war where there are no victors. Urges the study of history. Keywords: books, Russia, prayer (DDLW #771).The Catholic Worker, October 1060, 1, 3.