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Fall Appeal (October/November 1966)

Summary: She asks for help–“It is hard to be a beggar.” Admires the voluntary poverty of St. Francis, Gandhi, and Peter Maurin. In contrast, the “destitute and dissolute” are often despised as “bums” in the city and we fail to see “the sacred element in every human being.” (Simone Weil) (DDLW #844). The Catholic Worker, October-November 1966, 2.

 

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On Pilgrimage (February 1965)

Summary: Travels to North Carolina and Georgia to speak and visit friends. Recapitulates basic Catholic Worker ideas in a question and answer format. Comments on the government’s war on poverty, Communism in Cuba, the role of the Church in society, Vatican II, and the gap between haves and havenots. Keywords: war, voluntary poverty, work (DDLW #822). The Catholic Worker, February 1965, 1, 6.

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On Pilgrimage (September 1964)

Summary: Urges direct action on behalf of the poor instead of just being critical of the clergy. Criticizes the bureaucracy of the War on Poverty and quotes from the Sermon on the Mount to stress the need for individual action, particularly in regards to helping African-Americans. Keywords: non-violence, voluntary poverty (DDLW #818). The Catholic Worker, September 1964, 2, 8. The Catholic Worker, September 1964, 2, 8.

 

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On Pilgrimage (February 1964)

Summary: Remembrances of many who died this past year–former workers, guests, friends, benefactors–with descriptions of their work and character. Says their deaths are not cheerless as they will be with God. Mentions lists she keeps in her prayer books of those for whom she prays. Keywords: obituary (DDLW #820).The Catholic Worker, November 1964, 1, 2.

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Without Poverty We Are Powerless

Summary: Asserts the importance of voluntary poverty even if it means we are fools for Christ. Then gives a loving appreciation of Peter Maurin’s holy poverty, blending light-hearted stories and a graphic description of his dementia and silent suffering. Quotes from Fr. Faber on death in anticipation of Peter’s death within a year. (DDLW #468). The Catholic Worker, May 1948, 2, 7.

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What Dream Did They Dream? Utopia or Suffering?

Summary: A self-critical appraisal of the Catholic Worker movement’s first fifteen years. Readily accepts criticism of their ideals of voluntary poverty and pacifism, failure to implement Peter Maurin’s vision, of rigorous and demanding retreats, of internal dissent, and of their approach to helping the poor. Says they have not been good servants nor recognized the failure of the cross and the need to die to self. Says they are in a time of transition with only ten houses remaining. (DDLW #456). The Catholic Worker, July-August 1947, 1, 4, 6, 8.

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Poverty Without Tears

Summary: Reviews several books on voluntary poverty, especially Poverty by Fr. Regamey. Elaborates on the joy of, objections to, and purpose of voluntary poverty. Rejects capitalist and communist solutions to real poverty, pointing to decentralization and distributism as the answer. (DDLW #230). The Catholic Worker, April 1950, 1, 3, 6.

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Poverty Is the Pearl of Great Price

Summary: Discusses the difficulty of self-supporting and how voluntary poverty and manual labor are the means of the C.W. to achieve justice. Remarks that personal responsibility alleviates destitution but gives “plenty of holy poverty.” (DDLW #172). The Catholic Worker, July-August 1953, 1,7.

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More About Holy Poverty Which Is Voluntary Poverty

Summary: “Am I my brothers keeper?” Argues that increased state intervention limits personal freedom and responsibility. Sees the social security legislation and other state programs as taking responsibility from the community, parish, family and person. Voluntary poverty on the other hand promotes responsibility, since it comes directly from the person. (DDLW #150). The Catholic Worker, February 1945, 1-2.