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On Pilgrimage (April 1963)

Summary: Complains about a litter-filled city park, wondering why the unemployed aren’t put to work to beautify it. Receives a gift of Spanish language lessons and enjoys a visit to her daughter’s family in Vermont. Eulogizes Joe Roach, a long-time resident at their farm–“Joe was another Lazarus.” (DDLW #801). The Catholic Worker, April 1963, 1, 6, 7.

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Reflections On Work – March 1947

Summary: Focuses on worker ownership and calls for workers to fight for the means of production, to shun working for the war effort, for priests to come out of their rectories to help the poor, and for all to start the struggle for reform of the social order and against charity growing cold. Repeats the need to be one with the poor and to resist the present social order. (DDLW #452). The Catholic Worker, March 1947, 2, 4.

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To The Workers

Summary: An impassioned appeal to American workers asking them not to participate in the production of goods which will be used to wage war. She reminds workers of their power and begs them to unite and again sacrifice to further international truth and justice, not mass killing and destruction. (DDLW #347). The Catholic Worker, October 1939, 1, 3.

 

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Reflections on Work (December 1946)

Summary: Reports on the hard life and work of the coal miners of Western Pennsylvania and the strike demands of John L. Lewis. “We want to change man’s work; we want to make people question their work; is it on the way to heaven or hell?” Emphasizes the holiness of work and the sacramental quality of property. (DDLW #229). The Catholic Worker, December 1946, 1, 4.

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The Church and Work

Summary: Discusses in length the modern industrial problem of the machine and its relation to factory, land and worker. Explains the C.W.’s attempt to gain the workers back to Christ, by explicating a philosophy of work that distinguishes between those machines that are the extended hand of man and those that make man the extended hand of the machine. Such a philosophy sees people as cooperating with their creator, and to labor is to pray. Criticizes American Catholics for not applying Papal teaching to the work area and shows a particular acrimony to a priest who tell workers to sanctify their surroundings instead of changing it. (DDLW #154). The Catholic Worker, September 1946, 1,3,7,8.

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‘MAN CANNOT LIVE BY BREAD ALONE,’ AND NEITHER CAN A NORMAL WOMAN

“Man cannot live by bread alone, not even one dollar and eighty-two cents worth. Neither can a woman.” Dorothy Day’s humorous article about trying to live on $5 a week, the typical wage of young working women. (New York Call Monday, December 18, 1916, page 2.)