Why Peter Maurin Matters

Why Peter Maurin Matters

Peter Maurin’s influence on the Catholic Worker Movement is often overlooked, even in Catholic Worker circles. But he was the intellectual author of the movement, and gas much to teach the movement even today. A talk by Paul Magno presented at the Dorothy Day Centenary Conference, Marquette University, October 10, 1997.

Peter Maurin: To Bring the Social Order To Christ

Peter Maurin: To Bring the Social Order To Christ

For some time, Peter Maurin and Dorothy Day, along with the Catholic Worker movement they founded, have been thought by many to exemplify the prophetic voice in the twentieth century. However, the Catholic Worker movement is not without critics. Does a small movement, founded in the Depression, emphasizing personalism and the land, hold any hope for the massive social reconstruction necessary in an urban-bureaucrat age? An essay by Marc Ellis excerpted from Revolution of the Heart.

Peter Maurin’s farm-rooted vision

Peter Maurin’s farm-rooted vision

Seventy years after his death, Peter Maurin’s vision of a revolution marked by a synthesis of cult (religion), culture (learning and arts), and cultivation (agriculture) is gaining traction among a whole new generation of Catholic Workers living on the land. By Maria Benevento. Reprinted with permission from The National Catholic Reporter, May 15, 2019.

Peter Maurin Farm
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Peter Maurin Farm

Summary: Explains Peter Maurin’s ideal of “agronomic universities”–communal farms founded on a philosophy of work, especially manual labor. While an ideal, farm communities often suffered from too little skill and community conflicts. Lauds the new Peter Maurin farm on Staten Island and envisions deepening one’s spiritual life in work on the land. (DDLW #923). The Catholic Worker, Oct/Nov 1979, 1, 2, 7

 

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Peter Maurin, Personalist

Summary: Tells a story of Peter Maurin’s work at the Easton farm and goes on to summarize his principal teachings. Peter was a deeply religious man, a reader and constant student, who recommended books, especially the lives of the saints. He valued physical labor and wanted farming cooperatives, “clarification of thought”, and houses of hospitality. His faith was invincible, he exhorted a philosophy of poverty and the study of man’s freedom. (DDLW #914) The Catholic Worker, May 1965, pp. 1, 2, 5, 6

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The Story of Three Deaths: Peter Maurin, Lawrence Heaney, Willie Lurye

Summary: A loving obituary for Peter Maurin giving the details of his death and burial. Speaks of his last five years of illness, the day he died, his wake and funeral. Emphasizes the ways “He was another St. Francis of modern times.” (DDLW #495). The Catholic Worker, June 1949, 1, 2.

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Peter Maurin 1877-1977

Summary: Recounts her first meeting with Peter Maurin in 1932, his teaching style, his personal example, and his platform for the Catholic Worker: “Roundtable Discussions, Houses of Hospitality and Farming Communes–those were the three planks in Peter Maurin’s platform.” (DDLW #256). The Catholic Worker, May 1977, 1, 9.